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colette_heimowitz's Blog
Gluten-Free Atkins? It’s Possible!

You don’t have to go far to see the term “gluten-free” on store shelves or restaurant menus. Gluten is the protein in wheat that gives dough its elasticity, and many people now claim to feel healthier and better (and even lose weight) when they don’t eat gluten or cut back on it. For those with celiac disease (about 1% of the population), eating foods containing gluten can cause everything from irritability and depression or abdominal pain, bloating and diarrhea. About 6% of the population has been diagnosed with gluten intolerance, and, most likely due to a higher understanding of and bigger emphasis on food allergies, digestive health and genetic modification of grains, a quarter of Americans are cutting down on gluten or going gluten-free. When you avoid or cut back on gluten, you are naturally eliminating a highly processed grain, which explains why Atkins can be a gluten-free-friendly weight-loss program.

In early Phases, the whole foods recommended on Atkins have always been gluten free. You may even discover your sensitivity to carbohydrates and gluten when you first start Atkins and eliminate carbohydrate dense foods during Induction. If you start to feel worse once you reintroduce grains or flour in later Phases, you may have a reduced ability to process them, a kind of carb intolerance. And you may be sensitive to gluten. If you are sensitive to gluten, even complex carbs like whole-grain wheat could wreak havoc on your ability to lose weight and lead to a variety of other health woes. Although gluten free and low-carb are not one and the same, you can follow Atkins and be completely gluten free. As you progress through the Phases, once you hit Phases 3 and 4, closely watch your body’s reaction to whole grains. If you start experiencing discomfort or you are unable to continue to lose weight or maintain your weight loss, slowly cut back on the new carbs you have introduced until you start feeling better.

Your Guide to Gluten

Gluten is found in wheat, rye, barley and any foods made with these grains. These include but are not limited to:
   White Flour
   Whole Wheat Flour
   Durum Wheat
   Graham Flour
   Triticale
   Kamut
   Semolina
   Spelt
   Wheat Germ
   Wheat Bran

Common foods that are usually made with wheat include:
   Pasta
   Couscous
   Bread
   Flour Tortillas
   Cookies
   Cakes
   Muffins
   Pastries
   Cereal
   Crackers
   Beer
   Oats
   Gravy
   Dressings
   Sauces

You may not expect it, but the following foods can also contain gluten:
   Soups
   Breadcrumbs and croutons
   Some candies
   Fried foods
   Imitation fish
   Some lunch meats and hot dogs
   Malt
   Matzo
   Modified food starch
   Seasoned chips and other seasoned snack foods
   Salad dressings
   Self-basting turkey
   Soy sauce
   Seasoned rice and pasta mixes

Published Wednesday, June 25, 2014 03:12 PM by colette_heimowitz
Filed Under: Induction, Phase 3 & 4, Carb Balance/Carb Intolerance, Weight Loss, Nutrition, Cravings / Problem foods, Personal observations & lessons learned
Comments
GT-Gaby said:
Yes, and for those of us that have Celiac the Adkins diet works best. Althought, I can't tell if the Adkins frozen foods or the Adkins bars have glutten or not - it would be good to know and have the label marked with the GF if they are.
June 26, 2014 08:14 AM EST
mollytinker said:
Maybe you have a new tagline! Atkins: Naturally Gluten Free.
June 26, 2014 09:41 AM EST
trulypat said:
This is a good summary of gluten-free guidelines. What do you suggest in the Atkins recipes for easy gluten-free recipes?
June 26, 2014 03:01 PM EST
colette_heimowitz said:
For easy gluten free recipes your best bet is phase one options where , protein, fats, and vegetables are the mainstay. Just look at the instructions and don't use the recipe if they contain anything in list to avoid.
June 27, 2014 12:03 PM EST
Essvagon said:
In the recipes that call for soy flour, can almond flour or coconut flour be substituted and on which phase if they can?
July 24, 2014 03:56 PM EST
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